An access win in the kitty

An access win in the kitty

Disability-United-Editor - Fleur PerryI’ve learnt a lot over the past few years of campaigning, and one of them is that change can sometimes take a long time. A really long time. Good things come to those who wait.

Those of you who know me may recall me ranting about a bank a few years ago. The only entrance to the bank had a step – no ramp. This is not only unhelpful, but illegal. The Equality Act 2010 requires businesses to make reasonable adjustments so that customers with disabilities receive the same level of service. “Reasonable” is a bit of an unclear term, however if there’s no reason why the business can’t make an adjustment, then they are obliged to do so. As far as I could tell, there was no reason this bank couldn’t put in a ramp.

So began 2 years of letters, phone calls, emails, and a photo of me parked outside the bank waved in front of a senior manager. Here’s the photo:

Swindon branch lloyds-no-ramp

I think this might have been what did the trick (I mean imagine if it had ended up on Twitter). Here’s what it looks like now:

Swindon branch lloyds-ramp

This is just a short blog to say thank you Lloyds, for operating your central Swindon branch in a lawful manner. It might have taken you 20 years, but you got there!

I would also like to say I will be keeping my eyes open for unlawful branches of Lloyds on my travels – woe betide Lloyds if there are more…

Finally, if there’s a business without a ramp, or a hearing loop, or any other essential reasonable adjustment, and they can’t give you a reason why they don’t have it, I’d like to encourage anyone to make a formal complaint or to seek legal action. Change takes time, but good things come to those who ask questions.

By Fleur Perry

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